Montblanc Meisterstück Solitaire Platinum-Plated Facet LeGrand Fountain Pen Review

Montblanc Le Grand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-2

If you read this blog regularly you will know that this pen is not my typical cup of tea but as I was traversing the Warsaw airport I couldn’t help but see sale signs on a large Montblanc display.  The only pen that caught my eye was the Montblanc Meisterstück Solitaire Platinum-Plated Facet 146 (or LeGrand as they now call it).  I was curious to know how much it was and after seeing the price I decided to go for it.

Montblanc LeGrand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-5

This pen is the typical Meisterstück design but in a faceted platinum plated stainless steel body instead of the usual “precious” resin.  It really is quite a stunning pen to behold and has much more of a presence than its resin sister.

Montblanc LeGrand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-6

The facets create a tiled pattern.  You will notice that the face of the tiles are a mirrored platinum finish while the edges are brushed; this is a particularly nice touch and a testament to the craftsmanship put into this pen.

Montblanc LeGrand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-9

This 146 came with a medium nib which was too fat for my tastes but Montblanc has a free nib exchange program than can be utilized within six months of purchase.  At the Montblanc boutique in Berlin I was able to try their tester set and found that the OB nib offered the most line variation and the next morning I picked up my pen with the OB installed.  That is exceptional service.

Montblanc LeGrand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-4

The 146 is a full size pen fitted with an 18kt gold nib, a piston filling mechanism and a striped ink view window.  The standard resin 146 has a 14kt gold nib and when compared with the 18kt version I could not tell the difference.

Montblanc LeGrand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-8

The nib is noticeably soft and is a very nice to use.  The ink flow is on the drier side but the smooth nib conceals this quite well.  I have found that lubricating inks work best with this pen.

Montblanc LeGrand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-7

As is obvious in all of my pictures, this pen is a fingerprint magnet.  If you cannot handle finger prints and patina this 146 is a not a good choice.

Montblanc LeGrand Platinum Facet Fountain Pen-3

This pen retails for around $1,300 and even at over 50% off I don’t feel as though the price was a home run.  It’s very well made and nice to look at but to me it is not as special as say a hand turned Japanese pen or a pen made of beautiful Italian celluloid (all of which can be hand for a similar price).  If you want a flashy pen with the Montblanc brand cachet then this could make sense but otherwise at anywhere near retail I say forget it.

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Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen Review

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

The 13X series of pens were the first Montblancs to feature a piston filling mechanism. The 136 was the senior size pen just as the 146 is today in the current Meisterstück line.

The 13X series was produced in the mid 1930s to the end of the 1940s and possibly into the early 1950s as there was a brief point when the 13X line and 14X were sold simultaneously.

There are several variations of the 136 which I won’t cover here other than to say that my version is a later model with the shorter ink window.

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

The differences between the 136 and the original 146 were mostly in design. The 146 had (and still has) a streamlined cigar shape where the 136 has more of a flat top.

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen
136 cap with a star that has turned ivory in color over the years

They both had the same telescopic piston filling mechanism but if you look at the end of the barrel on a 136 you can see two knobs…the one at the very end is the regular piston filling knob you use to draw ink into the pen and the one below that is used to remove the actual piston filling mechanism…this makes repairs slightly easier.

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

I am quite fond of vintage Montblancs because they were very well made and have wonderful nibs. Unfortunately, these pens are expensive today, despite being mass produced.  Montblanc is now very valuable luxury brand name and this has had an effect on the prices of their vintage pens.

Like most pens, the larger the size in a given series the more expensive the price and that is certainly the case here. The oversized 138 and 139 are the most valuable and the 132 is the least. A 136 in black celluloid can range from about $400-$1,000 depending on condition. Most will be in the $600-$800 range.

All piston filler Meisterstücks that I have owned are suitable for daily use; they are reliable workhorses. With the older celluloid models, however there are a couple of things to look out for: 1) The cork piston seal. If the cork dries out there will be no seal, meaning you won’t be able to draw up ink.  The best thing you can do to prevent this is to use the pen regularly.  Alternatively, you can store your pen with water but be advised this method is not foolproof  2) Celluloid shrinkage. Many old Meisterstücks suffer from this and sadly there is no cure. The good news is that this rarely causes functional problems. Shrinkage on the cap can cause the cap rings to come loose and you may see subtle dips and bulges on the body and cap. On my pen there is some shrinkage on the section. You can see a little bump in the middle of it.

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

My 136 is fitted with a beautiful OB nib.

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

This nib is very soft and is wonderful to write with. These nibs were hand made and most I have come across are very soft. I have seen some Meisterstücks with flex nibs but these are considered extremely rare and generally command a small fortune.

Modern 146 on top and the 136 on the bottom
Modern 146 on top and the 136 on the bottom

You can see that the 136 has a larger and more shapely nib compared to what is currently used on a modern 146.

Again, modern 146 on top and the 136 on the bottom
Again, modern 146 on top and the 136 on the bottom
A view from the side shows that the feed is practically flush with the nib.
136 nib from the side

The 136 has a flat “ski-slope” ebonite feed that provides a generous amount of ink to the nib.

Ebonite "ski-slope" feed...looking ready for a deep cleaning
Ebonite “ski-slope” feed…looking ready for a deep cleaning

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

You will notice that unlike modern Meisterstücks the cap band is English, not German, and reads “MONTBLANC MASTERPIECE”.  This signifies that my 136 was an export model.  There is some debate about whether pens with “MASTERPIECE” on the cap band are more or less common than those that read “MEISTERSTÜCK”.  Based on what I have seen for sale on 13X and early 14X pens the cap bands in English are the most common.

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

The 136 weighs approximately 24 grams and measures 13cm long (or about 1.5cm shorter than the current 146). The 136 feels nice in hand and is a very comfortable size.

Montblanc Meisterstück 136 Fountain Pen

If you are looking for a vintage Montblanc I highly recommend a 136.

Mid Trip Report – Europe July 2015

Europe 2015

I am about halfway through my trip and while I haven’t been actively seeking out pens and pen related items I haven’t been able to avoid them.

While in St. Petersburg I found a nice lacquer miniature box made out of paper mache that fits a pen quite nicely.

Russian lacquer miniature pen box

Minding my own business at the Warsaw airport, I found a duty free store with some rather bold discount signs in a small section of their Montblanc display and I accidentally bought this Platinum Facet Le Grand fountain pen…oops

montblanc meisterstuck solitaire platinum plated facet legrand 146 fountain pen

Today in Budapest I came across BomoArt’s beautiful little shop.

BomoArt Budapest

There I bought some very reasonably priced notebooks as well a Le Typographe propelling pencil with built in lead sharpener.

BomoArt Leather journal

The interior is lined with a beautiful paper featuring hot air balloons.

BomoArt Leather journal

BomoArt Leather journal

I picked up a small 2016 calendar as well.   It has a leather binding and an antique map paper cover.

BomoArt Calendar

The paper is very fine…I was told that it holds fountain pen ink well.

BomoArt Calendar

I also bought four pairs of shoes (quadruple oops)…but perhaps this would be best suited for another blog.

Vass Shoes BudapestHopefully I will be able to make it through Germany and Austria without buying anything…that’s all I have for now.

 

 

 

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen Review

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

When I discovered the Romillo Pen brand last year I knew I had to have one.  On the surface Romillo embodied my perfect pen; one with no frills, just a simple pen focused on writing pleasure through a giant hand-made nib.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

After some back and forth with the pen maker, Álvaro Romillo, I decided on an Essential #9 in blue/black hard rubber with a semi-flexible #9 italic nib with rhodium trim and a solid silver lentil.

The lead time was only 1 month and after half a year with this pen I am finally ready to review it.

Appearance

The design of the Essential is ultra simple, flat ends, slight taper on the cap and barrel, and a rhodium plated solid silver roller stopper.  The blue and black mottled rubber has a nice semi-matte finish.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

The rhodium plated 18kt gold nib is enormous and paired with the skinny the long skinny pen body it really stands out.  The nib features hand engraved wings and the Romillo logo.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

I am very fond of the Essential’s simple shape, it’s not flashy, it’s subtle.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen
Swirled mottled rubber on the top of the cap

Score: 5/5

Build Quality

The Essential is all hand made and this shows for better or worse.  The fit and finish of hard rubber is excellent with not flaws that I could detect.  It is a beautiful material.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

There is an engraved number on the end of the barrel that isn’t well aligned and while it does not bother me, I point it out simply because I have never seen a pen numbered in this (sloppy?) way.

387 is the number of my Essential
My Essential is #387

The cap material is very thin but so far no issues to report.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

The finish on the nib is not perfect.  There is a dirty area on the left side at the base of the nib.  It is some sort of flaw in the finish.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

On the left tine if you look closely you can see what I am guessing is an air bubble in the rhodium finish.  Neither of these imperfections are really noticeable.  My fingerprint on the nib looks much worse than any of these flaws.  If you turn the nib upside down you can see that the underside of the tines are badly finished.  This flaw stands out the most.

Badly finished tines
Badly finished tines

There is a lot more handiwork that goes into making this nib than I have seen with other “handmade” pens.  I suspect that these flaws are a byproduct of more manual processes.  These imperfections could likely be avoided but the end result is still a beautiful and unique handmade nib.

When I think of the best fountain pens made today, I think of Japan and brands like Hakase, Nakaya, Ohashi-Do and Pilot/Namiki; while their nibs are of excellent quality they are all more or less based on a mass produced nib and that is where Romillo really stands out.

Score: 3/5

Size & Weight

The Romillo Essential #9 can be ordered in a custom length for no additional fee.  I went for the standard 153mm length (capped).  The Essential is a very long pen.  It’s longer than my Nakaya Naka-ai and my Montblanc 149, yet it is skinner than both of them.  At it’s widest point its about 14mm.

Left to right: Nakaya Naka-ai, Romillo Essential #9, Montblanc 149
Left to right: Nakaya Naka-ai, Romillo Essential #9, Montblanc 149

Uncapped the Essential measures just under 15mm.  The pen can be posted but the cap doesn’t sit very far onto the back of the barrel.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

The Essential weighs a 26 grams empty.  Because of the brass threading it is not well balanced and makes for a nib heavy pen even when posted.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

The nib is nearly 30mm long and I found “finger writing” to be quite uncomfortable with this pen. When I use my arms to write (as one should) I found no discomfort after 5 pages of writing.

Left to right: Aurora Afrika, Nakaya Naka-ai, Romillo Essential #9, Montblanc 149, Soennecken 1 Extra
Left to right: Aurora Afrika, Nakaya Naka-ai, Romillo Essential #9, Montblanc 149, Soennecken 1 Extra

If I were to do it again I would opt for the smaller #7 size nib as there are times when I do revert back to finger writing.

Score: 2/5

Performance

Performance is what a Romillo is supposed to be all about.  My nib was setup to be a “semi-flexible” 0.7mm italic with a generous flow.  First things first, it is not semi-flexible in the way that a vintage nib can be.  The tines do spread with ease compared to a modern rigid nib but it is no where near as soft as a vintage nib.

A huge thirsty ebonite feed
A huge thirsty ebonite feed

In addition to the enormous nib there is an enormous feed and I found that when freshly filled it can take a little while to get going.  Once it starts flowing there is no interruption in service and the pen performs beautifully.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

Again, there is an issue with “finger writing”.  The nib, like most italics, has a sweet spot but unlike other italics I have come across, the Romillo doesn’t provide the same sharp feedback, so initially, I found it difficult to get the pen writing properly without skipping.

If you write (again, as you should) with your arm and not your fingers the nib works flawlessly.

The biggest success of this pen is the nib, it feels like none other.

Score: 4/5

Filling System

Pens fitted with #9 nibs are only offered as eyedroppers and I was told that was because a converter could not provide enough ink flow to the feed.  The #9 is indeed very thirsty. The Essential has a large 2.1 ml ink capacity (roughly four times as much as a standard converter) and despite this I find myself having to refill this pen quite often.

Unlike other eyedroppers I have seen this one uses brass threading and a rubber o-ring to seal the pen.

Brass threading and O-ring
Brass threading and O-ring

I don’t know if the brass will do anything to the ink or if the ink will do anything to brass but to me this is an unusual application of brass.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

When filling this pen I recommend being conservative with the amount of ink you fill it with.  1.7ml is pretty safe.  If you fill up to the O-ring you are going to have a mess on your hands as when the section is threaded in O-ring is pushed down approximately 5mm into the barrel.

The section in this picture is not fully screwed down
The section in this picture is not fully screwed down

Lastly, it should be noted that screwing the section onto the barrel needs to be done with care.  I found that the section needs to be quite tight on the barrel so I had to twist it on more tightly than other eyedroppers I have had to use.

Score: 2/5

Value

With shipping from Spain the Essential cost 965€, that is a whole lot of money for a pen.  It is hard to call the Essential a value as there are pens that perform as well for much less money; what those pens will lack though is the personality and feel of a Romillo.

So how does it compare to the likes of my similarly priced Montblanc 149 and Nakaya?

Left to right: Montblanc 149, Romillo Essential #9, Nakaya Naka-ai
Left to right: Montblanc 149, Romillo Essential #9, Nakaya Naka-ai

From a writing perspective the 149 is the closest.  The 149 has an oversized nib and even larger ink capacity.  The 14C OB nib on the 149 is softer, and being from the 1970s it has more of a vintage nib feel.  The Nakaya shares a similar handmade feel to Romillo.

The Romillo is the least practical of these three pens because it’s the hardest to fill and runs out of ink the fastest.  That said, no other bespoke pen maker that I am aware of makes their own nibs; that is reason enough to own one.

Score: 3/5

Bottom Line

The Essential #9 has a unique feel and enough charm to make you forgive its faults.

Romillo Essential #9 Fountain Pen

Final Score 19/30

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen Review

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen Review

I have been collecting fountain pens for a little while now and have made a few poor purchases.  My most expensive blunder has been this pen, a Montblanc 149 Meisterstück.  (If you want just want to hear about the 149 as a pen skip down to the “Appearance” section.)

There is a well-regarded pen catalog (whose name I will not mention) and the best pens are purchased almost instantly upon release of the catalog so you don’t have much time to think.

The 1960s 149 that I had wanted sold before I had a chance so I jumped on the still available 1972 model and paid a hefty premium as it was new-old-stock.

The pen arrived in the original box with the original guarantee and with the sticker still on the pen.  When I took off the cap and found that the nib was tarnished and the rhodium plate had disappeared in spots.  The pen must have been dipped at one point and then put away uncleaned.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück
This is how I received the pen. With some light polishing with a jewelers cloth I was able to get rid of most of the orange tarnish.

I contacted the catalog owner and to his credit he offered a few fair options: 1) lower the price, 2) re-plate the nib, or 3) refund my money.  I foolishly became attached to the pen and decided to go for the lower price when I should have simply returned the pen.  Oh well…

Appearance

When I first saw a 149 in person years ago I thought it looked like a ridiculous cartoon pen; it is just so large.  I have come around to liking the looks of it’s imposing size but if I am honest I would be embarrassed to use this pen at work…or around people in general.

The streamlined shape with black resin and gold furniture is a classic and this pen really is the archetype for a luxury fountain pen. The 149 is an icon much like a Rolex Submariner and as such there are many lookalikes.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

The 149 has the best shape of any pen in the Meisterstück line. It is more cigar-like than the other Meisterstücks, which tend to have a longer and thinner profiles. There isn’t too much to say other than it’s a classic and a very attractive shape.

Score: 4/5

Build Quality

Montblanc has been producing the 149 since the late 1940s/early 1950s and there have been numerous iterations. The first models were the best quality and as such are the most valuable. So what about my early 1970s model? In my opinion, the Meisterstück line has gotten worse over time.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

My 149 is made from plastic (“precious resin”) and has a plastic piston mechanism (not the metal telescopic one from the 50s and early 60s nor the metal one in the current 149). The barrel is a single piece of plastic compared to the modern two-piece barrel, which is cheaper to manufacture.  The plastic is soft and scratches easily.  Montblanc finishes the plastic with a very high shine so it is possible to polish out scratches if they are not too deep.

The tri-color nib is made of a soft 14ct gold with a solid ebonite feed instead of the plastic feed and stiffer 18kt tri-color nib on the modern 149.  Montblanc produces all of their nibs in house and hand grinds and hand finishes each nib.  If you look closely you will see that the slit between the tines doesn’t quite line up with the design.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

One sore point on my pen is the plating on the nib. The rhodium (white metal) plating seems to have come off a bit. Which is something that shouldn’t really happen on a pen this expensive. I have confirmed through accounts of members of the Fountain Pen Network that this is not that uncommon for Montblanc pens.

Overall I would consider the build good but not great for a pen this expensive.

Score: 2/5

Size & Weight

One of the benefits of the plastic piston mechanism is that it keeps the weight down to 29.3 grams (empty). The 149 is the fattest pen I own and for me it is too fat to use comfortably for a longer period of time.  See the picture below…

Left to right: Aurora Afrika, Nakaya Naka-ai Negoro Shiro-tamenuri, Romillo Essential No. 9, Montblanc 149 (early 70s), Soennecken 1 Extra
Left to right: Aurora Afrika, Nakaya Naka-ai Negoro Shiro-tamenuri, Romillo Essential No. 9, Montblanc 149, Soennecken 1 Extra

Even though this pen doesn’t have the biggest nib it clearly has the fattest section by a big margin.

The pen measures just under 15cm long and 1.6cm at it’s widest point.  The grip section is about 1.3cm in diameter which is the most oversized measurement of the entire pen.  You can post this pen but there really is no need to do so as it is a hair over 13cm long uncapped.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

There are people with small hands and people large hands that love this pen so don’t assume that it wont work for you.  If you want a 149 I highly suggest to you try before you buy.  One of the major perks of owning a Montblanc is that there are many boutiques all over the world so they are easy to purchase and service.  It is worth mentioning that pens serviced by Montblanc may be repaired with modern (often less desirable) parts.

Score: 2/5

Performance

The big OB nib is a great performer. The nib has long tines that make the nib soft and springy. The OB point is more round than the points on the older 1950s nibs.  The rounder the nib the less line variation but the tradeoff is that nib is less position sensitive. Given the choice I much prefer the flatter nib.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

The nib does allow for some line variation with pressure; it is much better than most modern pens in this regard.

Score: 4/5

Filling System

One of the benefits of the 149 is the massive 2.7ml ink capacity. By comparison the average converter holds about 0.5ml of ink and the average piston filler holds about 1.0ml.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

The piston is very smooth and the striped ink window is ultra clear and has remained easy to clean.  One thing that I don’t care for is the amount of play in the piston knob once loosened; it hasn’t caused any problems but it doesn’t instill confidence.

If ink capacity is your top priority this may be the pen for you.

Score: 4/5

Value

Used, these pens can be had for around $300-$400. The 1960s versions go for a bit more and the 1950s models are usually over $1,000.  For $300 you get an impressive looking iconic pen that non-pen people will notice and appreciate; if that sort of thing is important to you, I can assure you wont do better for the money.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

New, the 149 costs around $900 and for me there many other pens that I prefer in terms of quality and comfort but none can really match the imposing presence of the 149.  If you want something with true snob appeal the $900 might be justifiable.

Montblanc 149 Meisterstück Fountain Pen

Score: 3/5

Bottom Line

The 149 is fat….fat price, fat size, fat snob appeal.

Final Score 17/30

Here are some great reviews of the Montblanc 149:

(I have no affiliation with the sites linked below)

Inky Journal – Montblanc Meisterstück no 149 (fine) Review 

Best Fountain Pen – Montblanc 149 Meisterstuck Fountain Pen Review

What! No Tea and Scones? – Montblanc Meisterstuck 149 Review

Montblanc Daniel Defoe Palm Green Fountain Pen Ink Review

 

Montblanc Daniel Defoe Palm Green Fountain Pen Ink

This year’s Montblanc Writer’s Edition celebrates Robinson Crusoe author, Daniel Defoe, with an unfortunately ugly pen.  The good news is that the limited edition Daniel Defoe Palm Green ink is beautiful.

Montblanc Daniel Defoe Palm Green Fountain Pen Ink
Notice how much the color of this ink changes from the very wet Geha to the very dry Lamy Stub.

Palm Green is a dark yellowy green ink with great shading.  The flow is about average and overall it is a well behaved ink.  Dry time is on the longer side (though I was using a wetter pen than normal) and the ink is not waterproof.

Montblanc Daniel Defoe Palm Green Fountain Pen Ink

I couldn’t find an ink that I had that was quite like it…its like a darker more green Alt Goldgrün.

Montblanc Daniel Defoe Palm Green Fountain Pen Ink

This is my favorite limited edition ink Montblanc has come out with in the last few years.  It’s not cheap at $19 per 35ml bottle but it’s such a nice color I think it’s worth it.

Side note: loved the label on the bottle as well as the packaging

Montblanc Daniel Defoe Palm Green Fountain Pen Ink

Montblanc Daniel Defoe Palm Green Fountain Pen Ink

Pilot Custom 743 Falcon Fountain Pen Review

Pilot Custom 743 Falcon Fountain Pen

The Pilot Custom 743 is the only pen to use Pilot’s full line of #15 size nibs.  In the store I tried three of the more unusual nibs: a music nib, a Waverly nib and a falcon nib.   I ended up picking the falcon nib, which is a soft flexible nib.  

Appearance

Like most pens in the Custom series, the 743 is a very traditional and classic looking executive pen with a black plastic body and yellow gold furniture.  The trim level is the same as you get on the Custom 823 and they look almost identical.  The trim ring on the bottom of the body is closer to the end of the pen than on the 823 (the 743 has vacuum mechanism to accommodate) but otherwise they look the same.

Pilot Custom 743 Falcon Fountain Pen

The cap has a rounded top with a clip that starts broad and narrows ending with a ball; this is the classic Pilot/Namiki clip and I think it looks great.  The gold band at the bottom of the cap reads “* * * CUSTOM 743 * * * PILOT MADE IN JAPAN”.  The letters are filled in with black (paint?) just as you would see on the Custom 845 and Custom 823.  The large 14ct gold #15 nib is plain, with no decoration to speak of.  The cuts on the sides of the nib help to increase flexibility and in my opinion make up for the lack of decoration.

Pilot Custom 743 Falcon Fountain Pen

 

The gold trim is much more yellow in color than the 14ct gold nib.  This is quite apparent with the cap posted.   I would like to have seen the gold match a bit better but it’s not a big deal.

All things considered, the Custom 743 is a clean looking pen with no strangeness to its proportions.  It’s not going to score any points for originality but it’s a nice looking pen nonetheless. Score: 3/5

 Build Quality

The build quality like most Pilot products is quite good.  The section (as on the Custom 845) has two big seams that just look cheap on a $300 pen.

Custom 845 with Custom 743.  Both have the same plastic section.
Custom 845 with Custom 743. Both have the same plastic section.

Unlike the Custom 845, the 743 also suffers from seams on the body as well. They are clearly defined in the threading on the body and then they disappear about a quarter of an inch in on the glossy part of the body.  You wouldn’t really notice any of this unless you are looking closely.  The fit and finish is otherwise quite good and I suspect this pen will last a long time.  Score: 2.5/5

Size & Weight

The Custom 743 measures about 5.9” capped and about 5.2” uncapped.  At its widest point it is about 0.6” and weighs about 25.6 grams with a converter full of ink.  Like the 845, the 743 is a good sized pen similar in girth to a Montblanc 146 but closer to the 149 in length. I find the 743 to be well balanced in my hand.  It looks quite long posted but it remains comfortable.  Score: 4/5

Performance

 

I think it is fair to say that this pen will not be for everyone.  I was lucky enough to try it in a store in Japan before I purchased it.  It would be a mistake to think you are getting a new pen that is going to write like a vintage flex pen; it does not and I haven’t seen a modern flex pen that does.

Compared to a vintage flex pen there is minimal flex when pressure is applied to the Falcon nib.
Compared to a vintage flex pen there is minimal flex when pressure is applied to the Falcon nib.

The falcon nib is a bit on the scratchy side, not unpleasantly so but there is a good amount of feedback.  With little or no pressure the nib writes with a pretty fine line, definitely an extra fine by western standards.

If apply some pressure you can get the line to become broad but this will require more force than you would need on most vintage flex pens.  I find that with nib flexed and writing slowly (as you should) the pen has a tendency to railroad by which I mean produce two thin parallel lines instead of one fat line.  The feed seems unable to keep up with the pen.

I have been experimenting with different inks and I have found Diamine inks to work the so far.  I tried Noodler’s Blue Eel as I thought that might help with the railroad situation but alas it performed the same as the Waterman and Pilot inks I tried.

The "no pressure" and "medium pressure" writing samples were written quickly at my normal pace.
The “no pressure” and “medium pressure” writing samples were written quickly at my normal pace and the “Pressure” sample was written slowly with the most pressure…notice all the railroad tracks.

In normal writing there are no real performance issues and I can get some nice (not huge) line variation with medium pressure without causing any problems but if you want to make extra extra fine lines and triple broad lines the Falcon nib isn’t going to cut it.  With a careful hand (sadly not something I possess) I have seen some beautiful western writing with the 743 Falcon.  Score: 2/5

Filling System

The Custom 743 uses Pilot’s top-of-the-line Con-70 converter that is considered by many to be the best converter on the market.  It holds a good amount of ink and is quite easy to use.

Pilot Custom 743 Falcon Fountain Pen

The 743 has the standard metal Con-70 which is not quite as nice as the black one you get in the Pilot Custom 845 and most Namiki pens but the function is the same.  Score: 3.5/5

Value

I bought my Custom 743 in the low $200s, which I think is a pretty reasonable price for this pen.  The retail price is 30,000 Yen (approximately $295 USD) is pretty high.  If the pen had no seams and the gold trim matched the nib nicely I could easily justify a $300 price tag for the 743.  Score: 3/5

Bottom Line

The feed prevents the 743 Falcon from living up to its full potential as a “flex” pen.

Final Score 18/30